International Prize: Storytelling Hack

Supported By: 
Ancestry

This category is about bringing life to data and helping people connect with the information that the data has revealed. Entries should seek to not only present data findings but to consider how you want people to respond to the data findings. A good story sets the scene for the character's and takes us through a plot in a way that engages people with values or emotions. Stories come in many forms including; art, film, books, journalism and sound. Some other popular ways of telling stories include comics, game development and digital video. What story is the data trying to tell you?

 

Eligibility Criteria

all Australian and New Zealand teams are eligible. Must use at least two Official GovHack Datasets. Open Government data must be used.

Home Sweet Home

Home Sweet Home
Team Name: 
Underscore

Home Sweet Home: Keeping up with the theme of "Games for Learning”, our team has decided to come up with a fun game to make learning interactive using the vast data sets available for all species. The intent of the game is to geographically place the species on a specific location (throughout Australia) based on their scientific names. Another cool idea we are implementing is to do a Flickr image search to receive the images for each scientific species name.

FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/GovHack2016HomeSweetHome/

Cute Commies

Photo of men talking on street corner
Team Name: 
Department of Digital Fabulists

This project has its origins in a talk given by Tim Sherratt to the Department of Digital Fabulists in late 2015. In talking about digitised archives and access to humanities data, Dr Sherratt shared work he had done harvesting images and documents from publicly available ASIO files held in the National Archives of Australia. We were immediately intrigued and keen to work with this dataset. GovHack 2016 presented the perfect opportunity.

Deconstructed coffee and Design - Melbourne Hipster Index

Team Name: 
A walk in the park

The creative and cultural sector contributes $22.7 billion to Victoria’s economy and employs over 220,000 people. Beyond their dollar contributions, the creative industries espouse identity, foster innovation and encourage social cohesion. Melbourne stands as the heart of Victoria’s creative sectors, and the city benefits greatly from the scale and depth of our creative industries, reflected in our consistently topping international liveability indices.