What are you afraid of?

Team Name: 
GovHackThePlanet

Media coverage of events such as terrorist attacks or shark attacks unnecessarily inflates fear and uncertainty in our community.

We aimed to use government data and other online sources to document the probabilities of different types of risks, 
to show that we don't need to be afraid of these events, and to promote the reality that Australians actually live in a safe community.
At the same time, we also like to bring awareness of risks due to factors such as health issues, many of which are things we can proactively prevent by having a healthier lifestyle.

We have created a mobile HTML app:"What are you afraid of?"

“What are you afraid of” uses a variety of data sources to work out what risks affect your demographic, from gender, age groups and location.
It attempts to highlight the differences between what you fear and what is likely to affect you - while also providing useful information on how to avoid, deal with or volunteer to help with those risks.

The user is asked to enter their details then clicks spin. They are then presented with a risk randomly chosen, but weighted based on probability from the data. This is combined with a link to educate about the risk.

Then the user is able to compare all the risks that could affect them versus another member of the Australian community. e.g. what are the risk differences between a man and a woman, someone in the city vs someone in regional Australia.

Used Datasets: 
Dataset Name: 
ERP by SA2 (ASGS 2011)
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Australian Bureau of Statistics
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the population size for each demographic group: gender, age-group, state and region (greater capital city and the rest of the state). This is data is used to calculate the likelihood of an event happening given a specific demograph and location. The most recent data (2011) was used.
Dataset Name: 
General Record of Incidence of Mortality (GRIM) books
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the mortality data grouped by age and gender, this is used to calculate the probability for a given demograph for each risk category. The most recent data (2013) was used.
Dataset Name: 
Crime Mapper: Regional South Australia
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
SA Attorney-General's Dept
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Government of South Australia
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the crime statistics for regional SA to calculate the probability of each risk category in the area. The most recent data (2013) was used.
Dataset Name: 
Crime Mapper: South Australia
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
SA Attorney-General's Dept
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Government of South Australia
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the crime statistics for metropolitan SA to calculate the probability of each risk category in the area. The most recent data (2013) was used.
Dataset Name: 
NSW Crime data
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
Jurisdiction of Data: 
New South Wales Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the crime statistics for metropolitan NSW to calculate the probability of each risk category in the area. The most recent data (2013) was used.
Dataset Name: 
Police Service Area Crime Statistics (Victoria)
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Victoria Police
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Victorian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We extracted the crime statistics for VIC to calculate the probability of each risk category in the regional and metropolitan areas. The most recent data (2009) was used.
Event Location: 
Adelaide