Do you know Australia?

Innovative agents of govhack
Team Name: 
Innovative Agents of GovHack

 

How do we measure perception against reality? 

Use the innovative agents of govhack minigame!

“Do you know Australia?” is a fun and engaging online mini-game platform where YOU can learn more about YOUR area, and WE can all learn about OUR perceptions.

 

We all carry cognitive biases that affect our perception of the world.

This is important because our collective perception has the power to change our communities. It impacts how we view our neighbours, how we interact with the people we meet, where we go and how we feel when we're there.

How do we measure perceptions so we know where to focus on improving them? So that we as communities, privates and governments can direct our attention, fuding and programs to the real issues. We need a better way of educating and engaging to understand eachother. We need the "Do you know Australia" minigame!

 

Using open government data on community themes, we present the user with a series of two random facts to compare about their area.

​​​​​​​Behind the scenes, we collect the response and record the comparisons made. For example, this can be used to test and measure perceptions about crime in your local area. The anonymised data collected from the app can then be used by local government, to better understand how their citizens perceive the level of risk in the community.

The platform can be adapted to explore any topics - enabling the exploration of perceptions of everything from race, to employment, to ecology, and more. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

The Data and App

We mashed together datasets which helped us describe a community. We wanted to test perceptions on core community themes and topics. We also used a number of boundary datasets which enabled us to repost across boundaries, link to more datasets and aggregrate. We mashed the data with postgres into a single table that can be accessed in an api. 

We created a REST API which expose stateless endpoints which can be integrated with external applications (such as a mobile app or website). The technology of choice is micro-services using Spring Boot for rapid development and deploy.

Wireframes were designed to show what a working protoype could look like.

 

Commercialisation

There are three potential revenue streams for the "Do you know Australia" mini-game. First, the call to action at the end of the game could be altered to promote events, services and businesses in the user's area which, based on the data they could be more likely to enjoy with the new, corrected perceptions. Secondly, the response data collected could be sold to help inform policy and business decisions by private organisations. Finally, the game itself could be repurposed around a particular issue to form a key part of an awareness campaign.

Used Datasets: 
Dataset Name: 
Basic community profile
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
ABS
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used ABS to feed in basic community statistics about a user's local government area to allow for a random comparison with other government data and to help educate a user on the make up of their area.
Dataset Name: 
AFSA Regional statistics
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Australian Financial Security Authority
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used ASFA to feed in financial statistics about a user's SA3 area to test their perceptions about the financial security of the people in their area and to allow for comparisons of other datasets, particularly innovation datasets.
Dataset Name: 
sa3-region-innovation-data
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used this dataset to test a user's perception and also educate them about innovation activity in their area. Anonymised and aggregated perceptions will be recorded and made open for analysis.
Dataset Name: 
administrative boundaries
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
PSMA
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used administrative boundaries to allow the aggregation of data and to allow us to link the user's current location to the datasets provided by other government
Dataset Name: 
Recorded Crime Dataset
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research Search...
Jurisdiction of Data: 
New South Wales Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used this dataset to test a user's perception and also educate them about crime activity in their area. Anonymised and aggregated perceptions will be recorded and made open for analysis.
Dataset Name: 
Settlement Data Extract
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Department of Social Services
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used this dataset to test a user's perception and also educate them about settlement activity in their area. Anonymised and aggregated perceptions will be recorded and made open for analysis.
Dataset Name: 
Higher Education Attrition Rates 2005-2013
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Department of Education and Training
Jurisdiction of Data: 
Australian Government
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We used Higher Education Attrition Rates to compliment data from the abs and innovation datasets in the random statistic generator. Anonymised and aggregated perceptions will be recorded and made open for analysis.
Dataset Name: 
iag flood data
Publishing Organisation/Agency: 
Insurance Australia Group
How did you use this data in your entry?: 
We aggregated high and medium flood risk to add an educational factor about flood about a user's area.
Event Location: 
Sydney Official